The reason for wasps having stingers, is so they can paralyze or kill their prey. However, they sometimes use these to sting people. Wasps will attack to defend their nests when they feel that it is intruded upon. Some wasps build a nest away from others. However, there are social wasps that live in colonies of various sizes and their nests are mainly built of wood fibres mixed with their saliva. Their nests are often sighted amongst trees and shrubs, under rockeries, in wall- or roof cavities and underground. Wasp stings are extremely painful – more painful than a bee sting. Their sting is often accompanied by a localized swelling of the affected area.

PAPER WASP

PAPER WASP

The paper wasp has a slender body with a narrow waist. It is about 10 – 15mm in length and has a small head. It has two pairs of long, thin, brown wings. The first pair is slightly larger. The abdomen of the paper wasp is black with yellow and orange bands. Yellow markings may also be seen on the face of the paper wasp. Their nests can usually be found under eaves of houses and amongst trees and shrubs.

EUROPEAN WASP

EUROPEAN WASP

The female is slightly smaller than the male, measuring 12-15mm in length compared to his 20mm. It has yellow bands on a black body. European wasps are fast fliers, flying with their legs held close to their bodies. They have clear wings that fold over their bodies. Their nests are commonly found underground, amongst tree stumps and rockeries and also in roof voids and wall cavities.

MUD WASP

MUD WASP

The mud wasp is quite large in size with a thin waist and long, slender legs. Its body is covered in black and yellow rings. They nest under eaves and attach their nests to the walls of buildings.